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ISBN 978-0-88692-887-2

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.1—

/ :

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EDISON GENERAL FILE SERIES

1914

Edison General File Series 1914 Edison Chemical Works (E-14-28)

Edison Chemical Works ^c u ^ 1910-1914 concerning reduced

shipments, and costs.

EPISbN CHEMICAL WORKS

SILVER LAKE. N. 3. July 21st/l4 .

Mr. Thomas A. Edison, Edison Laboratory, Orange , M . J .

Lear Mr. Edison; -

I hare investigated thoroughly the Miokel Hydrate matter, noting the list of hatches which you gave to Mr. Smith the other day, also comparing our various experiments. I sub¬ mit the following report ;- Method of loading^teat tubes at Orange.

The loading of the tubes by W. Archer's method and the drying of the samples Just before loading has made a very deoided diffefenoe . Simultaneously with the adoption of the second drying, we returned to the polioy of keeping the quantity of Niokel Sulphate oonstant "and varying the quantity of Soda

Solution used, so that the ratio between the metallic niokel

C, '

contents and the Soda contents would be uniform.

Results .

Ten (10) tests made by Research Eept . Just before maohine was

moved to W. Archer' s room;-

Batoh Ed . Wt . 1

#5158 7.898 1080

7 .890 1027

7.910 1123

1130

(Cont.)

Electrical Runs.

2 3 16

1303 : 1320 1313

m

1217 1233 1293

1280 1300 1263

&\v< r .

1297 § 1313 1287

#5145-6-7,

7.908

(Page 2)

#5148-9-50

, 7 .996

1093

1270

1273

1177

7.935

1083

1260

1277

1313

#5156,

7.962

1117

1320

1340

1343

7.843

1093

1270

1300

1270

#6151-2-3,

7.819

1183

1317

1343

1363

7.778

1157

1300

1313

1350

#5154,

7.897

1160

1340

1360

1373

7.902

1163

1343

1367

1377

#5155,

7.878

1180

1350

1360

1317

7.878

1190

1343

1350

1323

#5157,

7.945

1167

1367

1363

1303

7.828

1120

1310

1333

1313

#5159,

7.800

1143

1317

1333

1327

7.837

1117

1277

1310

1293

#6160,

7.880

1217

1347

1373

1343

7.775

1183

1307

1323

1317

Bight (8) testa male hy ff.

. Archer,

the firBt after the adoption

of seoondary drying, also

after adoption of standard proportion

between Hiolcel and Soda:-

Eleo . Rubb

Batoh

Ld.Wt.

1

2

3

#6278

7.618

1060

1217

1193

7.735

1017

1210

1167

#5280 ,

7.565

977

1187

1147

7.563

1060

1180

1167

#5281,

7.616

1073

1220

1173

7.605

1077

1223

1190

#6282,

7 .428

1053

1213

1197

7.492

1110

1220

1220

(Oont .)

(Page 3)

#5283, 7 *568

7.642

#5284, 7 .603

7.573

#5285, 7.573

7.556

#5287 , 7 .691

7.657

1047 1207 1193

973 1157 1153

1050 1213 1200

967 1160 1167

1077 1237 1217

1087 1227 1217

1053 1210 U90

923 1167 1130

Method of preliminary drying at Silver lake; -

It Is quite evident hy the results below that the temperature at which the’Uiokel Mush" is dried affects the loading weight and eleotrioal oapaoity.

It appears that the lowest loading weight is a re¬ sult of low temperature drying, but the best results, consi¬ dering the loading weight and the eleotrioal oapaoity as well, are derived by drying at a high temperature at first, and fin¬ ishing at a low temperature, according to your idea of 1300 Hiokel on the 16th run.

Series of tests made in Expt . Drying Id *Wt .

#1764 105 to 138°C 7 .695

7.716

#1766 Ditto 7.695

7.735

#1766 Ditto 7 .680

7 .655

#1767 1st) 105 -127° C 7.485 2nd) 95 -103° C 7.410

December last year shows this;

3

1133

1187

1183

1177

1177

1180

1243

1263

16

1220

1243

1243

1250

1247

1233

1300

1333

69

1293

1333

1367

1393

1400

1327

1400

1327

(Cont .)

(Eage 4)

#1768 Ditto

#1769 Ditto

#1770 #1771 Ditto

#1772 Ditto

#1773 #1774 Ditto

#1776 Ditto

7 .335 1263

7 .386 1227

7 .600 1170

7 .615 1213

1140

7 .340 1090

7 .525 1197

7 .480 1150

7 .310 1210

7 .325 1227

1157 1183 1127 1167 7 .580 1150

7 .575 1203

1367 800

1367 1390

1307 1387

1310 1373

1197 1257

1197 1240

1333 1333

1200 1200

1233

c.o.

1267

1217

C.O.

1200

1302 1313

1267 1343

1267 1377

967 1317

74 to 106° C 7.295

105 to 133° C 7.625 7.610 7.630 7.610

From these results it would appear that we should dry first at high temperature, and finish at low temperature, that is, below 100°C.

Previously we did this by changing the pans from the center to the top or bottom of the driers but when the driers were taxed to ihe utmost this custom was abandoned and as fast as the Biofcel was dry it was removed and new mush run in,

Proportion between Hlokel and Soda contents;- - - -

On October 20th last, we calibrated the tank in whioh the UiS04 solution is measured for preoipitation. This was done beoause the output of Hi ole el Hydrate per batch did not cor¬ respond with the oaloulated quantity. We found that the meas- (Cont .)

(Page 5)

urement was 30 to 100 liters short.

We oorreoted the measurements hut did not change the quantity of Soda used, believing that the oorreot quantities were what we should have .

The date of this change (Batoh #4720) corresponds , practically, with the increased electrical oapaoity, as shown by your list given to Mr. Smith,- "Batches 4725 and subsequent batches giving 1336-1372 M.A.H. after ten hot runs".

We have lately adopted the practice of using a uniform ratio between the Hiokel and Soda contents, namely ;- 2.82 to 1, and beginning with Batoh #5276.

The results so far obtained have been given in the first table above .

It would seem, therefore, that this constant ratio is also of some importance.

We have made a series of experiments in the Laboratory to show the effect of various ratios, but the loading weights have not as yet been determined by the present method of re -dry¬ ing the samples at Orange.

The results so far obtained bear out the statement

above, and are as follows; -

in all the experiments the Hiokel contents was the same, 105 liters at 56 G.B.l. Loading weights were determined by Aroher, but samples were not re-dried.

Expt . Ho.

HaOH

at 110 G.P.L.

Ld. Wt.

Elect . Runs . 3 16

#1975

167 Litres

7.733

1233

7.764

1240

#1972

157

7.630

1107

7.570

1177

(Cont .)

ir

/

(Page 6)

#1969

#1966

#1932

#1936

#1938

#1947

#1960

147 litres

137 "

125 "

116 "

106 "

96 "

86 "

7.662

7.660

7.926

7.979

8.209

8.100

8.228

8.067

8.240

8.287

8.076

8.033

7.178

7.128

1210

1213

1240

1210

1240

1233

1187

1193

1193

1187

1183

1187

1147

1120

1410

1417

1367

1363

1360

1267

1260

1347

1267

1250

Please note that 150.7 liters of Soda would corres¬

pond to the ratio of 2.82 to 1.

Temperature of wash water in percolation; -

lastly we have found that the temperature of wash water cannot he too high; i.e. as shown hy comparative tests

made before adoption of

the new

method of tube loading

He suits

Erpt .

Ho .

Part of large Batch

Temp .of water

Id. Wt.

Eleo.

3

Buns .

16

#1898

5168

Medium

7.775

1173

1290

7.709

1147

1280

#1898”a”

"

7.672

1150

1287

7.720

1147

1303

#1899

«

ooia

7.635

1107

1273

7.619

1083

1227

(Cont .)

(Sage 7)

#1899"a"

#1905 #190 5" a"

#1906

#1906"a"

#1907

#1907"a"

#1914 #1914" a"

#1916

#1916"a"

#1916

#1916"a"

water having

e have been lately following the praotioe of UBing

/u

a temperature of 60 to 70°0. r ^

conclusion, I wouia say, therefore, that we should j (Cont .)

(Page 8)

adopt the following practices ;-

(1) Present method of loading test tubes;

(2) Prying the nickel Hydrate mush for two dayB at 120°C., and finish drying at 90 to 100°C .

(3) Measuring the solutions so that there shall be a constant ratio between the Hiokel and Soda contents in the precipi¬ tating tank. Said ratio to be, at least for the present, 2,82 to 1, as based on the following formula; -

5300 liters HaOH at 110 O.P.I. _ 2>02

2295 litres HiS04 at 56 G ,P .1 .

2295 litres = the quantity of HiS04 solution used on the average previous to the recalibration of the HiS04 tank last Pall;

(4) Washing the Hiokel Hydrate & Salts with water between 60° and 70° C.

Yours sincerely.

EDISON CHEMICAL. WORKS

Hr. Thomas A. Edison, Edison Laboratory , Orange , H . J .

Dear Hr. Edison;- Re/lTickel Hydrate Tests.

We have gone over the results of all the teat tubes now running in the Research Dent . We would report that a great num¬ ber of them are filter press experiments dating back a year or more. Host of these, we think, are important to run, or at least, to run until the irons are renewed and three cold runs are made . We have directed the Research Dept . to change the irons in quite a number of them, and to give us the results. If they are still low, we will cut them out, unless you think that they ought to be cut out without trying new irons.

We have out out a few of those experiments made in other ways than filter press .

The following tubes, which are running, are experi¬ ments of yours;- E 456 - 457 Exp. 294,

E 458 - 459 " 295.

We send you attached the results of experiments made to test the effect of Phosphoric Acid on Hickel Hydrate.

Yours sincerely,

EDISOE CHEMICAL WORKS

JVM/JCR

[ATTACHMENT/ENCLOSURE]

To determine whether or not Phosphoric Acid will combine with Hiokel in precipitation of Hi(0H)2.& effect on capacity.

Experiment Ho .

1918

1920

1919

1921

2063

Kind of Phosphoric Acid

Ortho

Ortho

Meta

Meta

Pyro

Added to

HiS04 Sol'n

HaOH Sol'n

HiS04

HaOH

Hi SO 4

Amt which combines wiihHi(0H)2

.087 $

.074$

.195$

.16$

.085$

Tube Humbers

E 380-381

E 384-385

E 382-383

E 392-393

E 524-525

Loading Weight .

7 .713-7 .770

7 .798-7 .760

7 .818-7 .770

7.760-7.720

7.420-7.380

Electrical Runs 1

1063 1077

917 927

1210 1210

1077 993

887 950

2

1163 1173

1033 1083

1093 1083

1120 1087

1080 1100

3

1180 118V

1160 1117

1123 1127

1157 1117

1087 1123

14

1300 1357

1250 1257

1300 1327

1393 1323

1233 1260

15

1340 1360

1293 1257

1323 1340

1387 1333

1227 1243

16

1323 1350

1260 1253

1320 1317

1367 1323

1210 1217

57

1390 1363

1317 1293

1357 1187

1390 1333

1320 1317

58

1300 1313

1307 1273

1310 1280

1320 1203

1300 1290

59

1290 1280

1287 1233

1277 1297

1297 1257

1267 1260

2062 Pyro HaOH .16873 E 520-521 7 .577-7 .531 883 910

1100 1133 1117 1143 1227 1240 1227 1223 1203 1203 1320 1317 1300 1290 1267 1250

Duplioate Samples,

Dried at 212 loading Weight, .

3-7.445 7.413-7 .S

7.445- 7.550 7.505-7.547

[ATTACHMENT/ENCLOSURE]

To determine the

effect of Phosphoric Acid

on Hiolrel Hydrate, if same is moistened hy the Aoid .

Experiment No ,

Kind of Acid,

Tube Numbers, Loading Weight, Eleotrioal Runs 1 2 3

14

15

16

57

58

59

2059 Ortho E 504-505 7.1S3-7 .162 103 117

0 0

0 0

2061

Meta

E 508-509 7.125-7 .094 977 907

1057 1033 1093 1043 1190 1133 1167 1123 1157 1093 1280 1217 1260 1210 1243 1193

2060

Pyro

E 506-507 7 .000-7 .040 733 740

967 950

1023 1017 1180 1183 1117 1150 1197 1153 1190 1227 1167 1207 1167 1187

Dear Hr. Edison:- Re/ Caustic Potash.

Herewith is a report on my trip to Niagara Palls ; - Muriate - It would appear that the quality of the caustic potash

produced by the Niagara Alkali Co . or might he produced by the Castner Electrolytic Alkali Co., depends almost entirely and di¬ rectly on the quality of the muriate. That is, as the percentage of I'TaCl in the muriate increases, the percentage of HaOH in the product increases .

Prom my interviews , I learned that the muriate, as mined in Germany, carries quite a low # of KOI, somewhere in the neighborhood of 12#. This raw material is purified in Germany, by dissolving and reoryetallising, and made into several grades ranging from 80# to 93 or 100# KOI .

The 80# grade is used principally by fertiliser people, whereas the 98 to 100# is used for making caustic potash of the best quality, neither the Niagara Alkali Co . nor the Castner people have an equipment to purify this low grade muriate . Niagara Alkali Oo.- This concern is of considerable size, has substan¬ tial buildings, and is said to be connected with German concerns. I oould not definitely learn whether or not it is connected with

Hr. E .A .Edison. -2- Hov. Ilth/l4 .

the Potash Syndicate.

X talked with the General Manager and obtained the following information; -

Che plant is now operating on muriate of Potash, 30$ grade, supplied by Harden, Orth & Hastings Oo . , of Boston. Chis Co. has tho full control of the product.

Choy have a considerable stock of caustic potash on hand at the plant.

Che manager 3 aid that they would guarantee supplying us with caustic of the following analysis }-

KOH - 70 - 75$

HaOH - 10-15

KOI - 1.75 Maximum

Si02 - trace

K0CO3 - 2 - 2.5

Ca - trace

Fe-Al - .1

Che -oercentage of KOI might he reduced to 1.5 and the manager said they would select batches with the lowest percent¬ age. Prom their analyses I judge that the minimum would be 1.4$.

Che percentages of KOH and HaOH depend upon the quali¬ ty of the muriate . Chey have no way of freeing the muriate of the soda content .

Che price quoted us by the national Aniline end Chemi¬ cal Oo., N.Y., representatives of tho Niagara Alkali Co, was 17^ per lb in carload lots of about 35ooo lbs,- Value §5950 .22. .

In regard to reducing muriate supplied by us, I was informed that this was probably impossible, due to the arrange¬ ment with the Harden , Orth & Hastings Co. Chair agreement is to continue until muriate oan be obtained by the Niagara Alkali Co . directly from Germany. Also, it wouia be of no advantage, as thi

ISr. ff .A .Edison,

llth/l4 .

muriete supplied by John B. Sloane is of the same grade as they are at present running on.

Xt might he possible, however, that Harden, Orth & Hastings Oo . would he willing to add Sloane' s muriate to their

stock. I propose to see their H.Y. office about this. If wo

could supply the muriate they would charge us $100 .°° per ton of total alkali for°§S® and would guarantee a maximum con sumption of 1 .35 tons of muriate per ton of total alkali .

30$ muriate from Sloane, ---------

Uuriate per lb of caustic, ------ - - 1.35 lb:

Oost of reducing at $100 per ton of total alkali- $ .05 p . 1

Haw material cost = 1.35# x .j.04

Cost of converting

Cost per lb of total alkali

lb .

lb of raw

.0540 0500 .1040 .0912

In regard to getting our supply regularly from this concern, would report that the manager believes he could supply us with caustic equal to the German product with the exception of KCl . The percentage of this would be about 1,287a*

Their price for the last few years has ranged between 4 ana 5 cents per lb. Our present price from Klipstein is 5.4^.

Partner Electrolytic Alkali Oo X had two interviews with the man¬ ager of this plant. He was quite loath to take up the matter, stating that his plant was running at full capacity on caustic soda, and to make potash would necessitate setting aside a unit, decreasing their output of soda without any real increased remun¬ eration. However, he finally said that he would take it up with the Directors, and recommend their attempting it on the following

IEr ; ffi .A .Edison ,

-4-

Hov. llth/14.

grounds; -

(1) - as an accommodation to you,

(2) - that a permanent arrangement, covered by a contraot, for at

least two years, would be entered into later.

In regard to the quality of the product, it would ap¬ pear that their type of cell makes a better grade of caustic than that of the Hiagara Alkali Co . especially as to Chlorine .

Some years ago iiiey made several tons of caustic pot¬ ash, using 80 to 965$ muriate. An analysis of this which they showed me was as follows ;-

KOH - 85.635?

ITaOH - 11 .74

KC1 - .19

K2CO3 - 2 .50

K2SO4 - .34

!i?2itoe)- - traoa

From this you will see that the percentage of KOI is far better. The percentage of impurities, such as sulphates, iron, silica, etc, would depend upon the quality of the muriate.

If they would go into this, their conditions would be approximately as follows; -

(1) - They would reduce at once about 150 lbs of the muriate,

which we would supply them, as a preliminary test for quality. They would send us a sample of the caustic liquor .

(2) - They wovild set aside a unit and run thru 100 to 800 tons to

tide us over, with the understanding that, should the product and proposition prove satisfactory, you would enter into an agree ment with them for potash covering a period of at leaBt two years It would take about one month to run thru 100 tons of muriate . That we are to furnish the muriate .

(3)-

Hr, (0 .A .Edison,

Hot. llth/14.

(4) - Chat the price for reducing would he about 3 cents per lb

j of caustic potash for the 100 or 200 tons, and possibly less on

a 2 year oonti'aot .

(5) - Chat wo would take from 3 to 4, or 7 to 8 tons per week, de-

i pending upon the number of units they would set aside .

I have, therefore, asked John Sloane to ship at once 200 lbs of muriate to -them for an immediate test. ' j

Also to send 200 lbs to us at Silver lake, in order to j

: experiment on purification of the 80$ muriate by recrystallisa¬

tion. At present we have all our iron sulphate tanks available.

Che price of potash thru this concern would be about I

I 2 cents less than from the Niagara Alkali Co.

j It would appear therefore, that these prices are con¬

siderably lower than that quoted us for the caustic potash held by Harden , Orth & Hastings Co.

X would recommend that we see this concern and try to lower their price, but anyway, procure a carload to mix with the German product wo have on hand.

Analysis of a sample of this product just received, is

BPISOH OBEMIOAL WORKS IBTSSIIGAIIOH QUALITY of HICKEL HYPEATE and IEOH MIX

Peo. Ist/l4 .

ITIOHEIi HYDIUT3

Investigation of Cau3e of Sediment in Cells and also drop in Capacity .

Cells made in 1312 and sinoo show a considerable in¬ crease in sediment, and also lower capacity than those made previous to 1912.

Investigation of Iron, Nickel Hydrate, end Potash as supplied hy Silver lake .

IROIT MIX - The procossos followed out in the various steps in the manufacture of Iron Mix are exactly the sane as those in 1911, except that we have standardised all measurements, temp¬ eratures, etc. Have also added many cheek tests. The Ircm Mix, aB made to-day, is considered hy Messrs. Bachman, lionohan, and Mclain entirely satisfactory.

In 1912 wo had considerable trouble with the iron. This was evidenced by lightness, difficulty in loading, and low electrical capacity .

WTmrwT. HYDRATE- In the Summer of 1912 we increased the capacity and made the following changes ; - HiSCH Sept 5 , Nickel dissolved in new type of percolators , saving hydrogen, etc.

Hi (OH) Precipitation- Rearranged all tanks so that the precipi¬ tation was made in one tank and run off. to two tanks below for settling.

1)- Precipitating tank is exactly the same in type as the for-

2)- Steam ooil in this is the same as before.

a/ocfaherr of

Z)- In order to hasten theAprecipitation, v/e used city water airoct, in addition to distilled water. Mr. Edison ap¬ proved the use- of city water .

4) - We haa previously used oity water in mating up the soda

solutions .

5) - Upon mating the first hatch-, it was found that the percent¬

age of soda and salts did not correspond to former hatches. We then came to the conclusion that the former soda tanks were not calibrated correctly and wo adjusted the quantum of soda solution to make the analyses the same as before. Possible differences due to above changes ;-

1) - Impurities arising from use of more city water.

2) - Chilling of solution, somewhat, during precipitation, by

use of cold city water.

3) - Chilling of solution while running from Precipitating tank

to Settling tanks.

On July 21, 1914, we, with the approval of Mr. Edison, standardized the precipitation process by using a definite pro¬ portion between the total grams of ITiokel and the total grans of Soda.

We also adopted the standard of 60° to 70°C. for wash water at percolation-.

Hi (OH) g Drying.

Driers - Ho change in general design.

1) - Boxed in fittings at end of coils driers.

2) - Slight change in number of pipes per layer to even the

temperature throughout drier .

- 3 -

3) . Temperature of entire driers Have varied from 90 to 120°0,

Hut v to have tried to keen under 100°C.

4) - Steam pressure in mains increased.

5) - Up to 1912, nans were shifted from hotter zone to cooler

zone, and partially dried material was broken up.

During June, July and August, breaking up was discontinued, but was resumed on Sept. 13th. Discontinued later (date uncertain) so as to increase output of driers. Seemingly no bad effect resulted.

Miokel Hydrate-Electrical Capacity.

For the electrical capacity, we would refer you to general data sheet "A", attached to this report.

There has been some variation in the capacity, but practically all been between the allowable limits, 1200 and 1400. Also the later run has been higher than the 3rd run.

In the Summer of 1914, the capaoity on the 3rd run was high, and also on the 16th; but after the samples were dried and loading was done by W. Archer, these runs were nor¬ mal, end also the loading weight was much lower.

Some regular electrical tests have been continued for endurance . See Table "0" .

POTASH.- on Aug. Vth/12, we were compelled to use a poorer

grade of Potash on account of manufacturers not being able to supply sufficient' "Chlorine free" Potash. This grade is known as "ordinary 90/5 Potash".

Same was used with "Chlorine free" Potash in the ratio

of 2 to 3.

One batch was maac up of only "ordinary Potash" , and was used for tv/o batteries which conia be carefully 1 watched. It is now reported that these batteries are 0 .1C .

Hi(OH)g - General Remarks; -

Aug. 2l/ll - .ifo Cobalt added to Hi SO 4-.

June 1912 - Hew tanks for soda, precipitating and settling. Aug. 28/12 - .5/o Cobalt added to HiS04>

Aug. 7/12 - Began using "ordinary" Potash in place of "Chlo¬ rine free" Potash. Use O.IC’d by Mr. Edison.

The complaint has been made from time to time at Orange that the Ki(0E)2 has been different, as to color and hardness .

The matter of color has been brought to Hr. Edison's attention on several occasions , and has been explained by in¬ crease of percentage of Cobalt. 7/e can quite positively prove this. See general data sheet "A" attached to this report.

As to hardness or fines, v/ould report that we have made a number of experiments, varying proportions, method of drying, etc. V/e believe that the Hickel is being made just the same as it has always been made, with one exception, and that is the presence of .3 fo Cobalt in place of none in 1910, and .155 in 1911 .

On Sept. 24/14 we picked out samples of hydrate dat¬ ing back to 1910, tv/o made in Jan. and two made in June of each year . V/e tested these for fines and brittleness by

(1) - Screening over 190 mesh,

(2) - Grinding thru coffee mill set by gauge,

- 5 -

fS) - Screening in mechanical shaker.

See Cable "B" .

By this it is seen that there is very little differ¬ ence in fa of fines, that is, thru 190 mesh on final screening.

V/e have just completed making another test of fines and brittleness of samples of hydrate made the first and mid¬ dle of each month since 1910 by

(1) - Drying 30 grams,

(2) - Screening on 30 mesh screen by hand,

(5)- Grinding in coffee mill and screening on 30 mesh,

(4) - Repeating twice,

(5) - Screening in mechanical shaker on 190 mesh.

Results of these testB are shown on general data sheet "A" attached to this report.

These tests show that there is practically no dif¬ ference in hardness or fines .

Furthermore the reports from Orange covering the of fines as removed by grinding and washing shov/ no difference . See data sheet "D" .

Ay Crranyc.

One of the reasons given Afor this opinion is that the hydrate does not crack sharply causing considerable noise, and does not shake the mill while passing thru,** Utk ba.Wy

X would bring to your attention the fact that the rolls and entire washing plant was moved from the 4th floor to the 3rd, about Sept. 1912. Also that the building has been extended . Possibly owing to these two changes, conditions have been altered which might deaden the sound , or the rolls

a firmer base.

Perforations of Tube-Stock

In examining the tubes now being made, it appears to the writer that the perforations are quite large .

y/e have picked out from a lot of test tubes returned here several oia and now tubes , and have examined same . It would appear that the perforations of 1910 and 1911 are smaller than those at present .

See exhibit of tubes .

GENERAL CONCLUSIONS -

We believe that the Iron Mix and Nickel Hydrate have been equal in quality to that made in 1910 or 1911, and also that the product is more uniform, especially the Iron Mix.

The only difference in either is the presence of Co¬ balt in the Niokel Hydrate , which decidedly darkens same .

We would suggest that a thorough investigation be made at Orange, of the following; -

1) - Perforations of the tube stock.

2) - Treatment of the hard rubber parts.

3) - Quality of lithium Hydrate being used.

4) - Method of adding Lithium Hydrate to cells .

EDISON CHEMICAL WORKS

>

1504

1524

1554

1G3S

1710

1735

1751

1794

1327

1861

1974 2003 2042 2030 2119 2154 2190 2223 2256 2262 2269 ' 2279

7.455 7 .633 7 .742 7.533 7 .352

7 .575 7 .810 7.631 7 .774 7 .340 7 .645 7 .745 7.764 7.340 7.693 7.548 7.578 7.823 7.817-

1250 1253 1180 1193 1117 1210 1200 1220 1203 1210 1230 1223 1210 1227 1207 1227 1210 1217 1327 1307 1223 1190 1223 1215 1137 1193 1250

1107 1257

1100 1257

1150 1223

1177 1253

1260 1205

1257 1280

1240

1250

1253

1230

1283

1253

1267

1213

1220

1255

1247

1237

1260

1237

1297

1233

1510

1253

1253

1503

1300

1503

1535

119’

1197

1260

1247

1290

1280

1270

1260

1217

1263

1260

1353

1305

1297

1287

1300

1347

1327

Increased else of batch from 400 to 450# with hatch #1393

Began using .1$ Co with hatch #2091 .

1245 1430

1257 1570

1243 1377

1257 1317

1193 1247

1163 1310

1133^12^

Batch Date Mo . 1012.

Jan. 2290 2314 Feb. 2338 2371 Mar . 2404

2439 Apr . 2494

2514 May . 2552

2593 June 2634 2674 July 2714 2770 Aug. 2827 2881 Sept . 2936

2990 Oot . 3044

3112 Hot . 3181

3246 Deo . 3312

loading ~ " Electrical Capacity 7/ei^ht 3 16 56 _ 2olo-

7.475 7 .596 7 .560 7 .666 7.563

7.694

7 .626 7.416 7.651 7.739 7.581. 7.523 7.431 7.851 7 .699 7.782